RSS

Tag Archives: trials

Praise Ye the LORD!

 

Psalms 146

1 Praise ye the LORD. Praise the LORD, O my soul.

2 While I live will I praise the LORD: I will sing praises unto my God while I have any being.

3 Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

4 His breath goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; in that very day his thoughts perish.

5 Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help, whose hope is in the LORD his God:

6 Which made heaven, and earth, the sea, and all that therein is: which keepeth truth for ever:

7 Which executeth judgment for the oppressed: which giveth food to the hungry. The LORD looseth the prisoners:

8 The LORD openeth the eyes of the blind: the LORD raiseth them that are bowed down: the LORD loveth the righteous:

9 The LORD preserveth the strangers; he relieveth the fatherless and widow: but the way of the wicked he turneth upside down.

10 The LORD shall reign for ever, even thy God, O Zion, unto all generations. Praise ye the LORD.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 19, 2017 in God's Love

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

“A Man Who Feared God”

Although the Book of Job seems to be about a righteous man who endures incredible suffering, it does focus more on God’s Wisdom and Sovereignty. The grand themes of God’s wisdom and justice are indeed more significant than the suffering and faith of Job. The Book raises rather intense questions that we humans spend time on at different points in our lives: “Why do the righteous suffer? Why would God allow such suffering? Why should a man believe in God? Why believe in God when we cannot visibly see Him?” The answers to those questions point out the limitations of our human wisdom as opposed to the immense, unlimited wisdom of God.

I first want to address the fact that Chapter 1 tells us that God considered Job “perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil.” So, why did He allow all this suffering to come upon him? Let us not forget verses 6-12 in Chapter 1: “Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan came also among them. And the LORD said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it. And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought? Hast not thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on every side? thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land. But put forth thine hand now, and touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face. And the LORD said unto Satan, Behold, all that he hath is in thy power; only upon himself put not forth thine hand. So Satan went forth from the presence of the LORD.” God knew Job’s heart more than even Job did, just as He knows us more than we know ourselves. We know that satan roams to and fro on this earth seeking God’s strongest so that he can attempt to destroy them, but we learn here that that evil beast must ask God’s permission first. I believe that if God did not believe Job strong enough to get through these afflictions, He would not have allowed them.

Job’s friends thought they had all the answers for Job, and God let them ramble on for a time with ‘their’ opinions; much longer than I like. Although our friends, and ourselves in vice versa, sometimes just want to ‘help’ us get through our suffering with what they believe to be ‘good answers,’ they might do better to just be there and be sensitive to God’s Holy Spirit before speaking. I see Job’s friends’ answers as comfortable for them, but not comforting for Job. God let them know that their answers were inadequate and just plain wrong. They spoke from their experience and from traditions that were limited to the doctrine of retribution –  the belief that suffering is always punishment for sin. After God confronted Job, He told Job’s friends that He was angry with them because their answers were sinful and for them to offer up burnt offerings in atonement, AND He told them to let Job pray for them asking that God not deal with them as they deserved. Job 42:7, 8 “And it was so, that after the LORD had spoken these words unto Job, the LORD said to Eliphaz the Temanite, My wrath is kindled against thee, and against thy two friends: for ye have not spoken of me the thing that is right, as my servant Job hath. Therefore take unto you now seven bullocks and seven rams, and go to my servant Job, and offer up for yourselves a burnt offering; and my servant Job shall pray for you: for him will I accept: lest I deal with you after your folly, in that ye have not spoken of me the thing which is right, like my servant Job.” I believe that God understood Job’s questions and frustration about the horrendous losses He allowed him to suffer, and what a compliment to Job that God had confidence that he would not curse Him for it.

There is definitely a greater answer to Job’s suffering founded on God’s great wisdom. As I noted above, we have a rare behind-the-scenes look at God’s control and limitations that He put on Satan. Job was singled out by God to be a tested man of faith. satan accused God of bribing Job to believe in Him: Job 1:9, 10 ” Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought? Hast not thou made an hedge about him, and about his house, and about all that he hath on every side? thou hast blessed the work of his hands, and his substance is increased in the land.” Job came through this testing without sin, even in the face of the crushing disaster and the undeserved suffering. Even his wife told him to “Curse God and die.” He responded: Job 1:22; 2:10 “In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly…But he said unto her, Thou speakest as one of the foolish women speaketh. What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil? In all this did not Job sin with his lips.” The key to having this mindset is staying so very close in our relationship to God, searching and standing on His promises in His Word. If we are not close to Him, our flesh listens to satan’s lies and we become angry with God.

In the first 13 chapters of Job, the question “Why?” is asked over and over, but with no reply. In our minds, the question demands an explanation and a justification, but even if Job could have understood God’s answers, he would have only known “parts of God’s ways: Job 26:14 “Lo, these are parts of his ways: but how little a portion is heard of him? but the thunder of his power who can understand?” Our human minds lack the capacity to truly understand God’s ways, therefore, when we are faced with suffering, it is actually inappropriate to ask “Why?”

A better question would be “Who?”; “Who is in charge?” When God replied to Job He asked him, “Who?” at least 20 times in Chapters 38-41. When the “Who?” is God, then the persisting “Why?” is softened. The Believer can be like “a child that is weaned from his mother,” a child who has learned to wait for and to trust in his mother to give him what he needs at the right time: Psalm 131:2 “Surely I have behaved and quieted myself, as a child that is weaned of his mother: my soul is even as a weaned child.”

So, Job rightly and unwaveringly named God as the One who is ultimately responsible for all his suffering. He did not ever once blame satan, who was the one who directly struck him with those suffering blows-Job 2:10. God Himself told satan in Job 2:3: “Thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.” God is not only in charge of the “good” things that happen to us while “helplessly” observing as “bad” things happen, but He is sovereignly in control of ALL things, good and bad. He permits His children to endure testing. At times, we want only to accept the good from God’s hand, but then we risk rejecting Him completely when things do not work out as we desire. That limited attitude of God’s wisdom is very foolish indeed, and we miss out on the blessings that come with our growth through testing.

Though Job was grief-stricken and bewildered at his trials, he recognized that God was in them and he determinedly chose to cling to God: Job 13:15 “Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him.” In his destitute and exhausted state Job uttered what I believe is a profound statement of faith: Job 19:25-27 “For I know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.” While Job was in what we consider to be a hopeless state of affairs, he did not lose sight of his, and our, greatest hope that no matter what happens in this world, we can look forward to the world of Heaven to come. So, if our sufferings do lead to death here, we can be comforted that we will immediately be in the presence of our loving Saviour and Lord.

In Conclusion: Only our Lord knows all the whys and wherefores of our human suffering. Until “then shall I know even as also I am known,” knowing Him is more than enough for now:

1 Corinthians 13:12 “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.”

2 Timothy 1:12 “For the which cause I also suffer these things: nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day.”

James 5:11 “Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 20, 2015 in God's Truth

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Praising God Through Life’s Adversities

We all have our mountains and our valleys throughout our lives, and I believe those valleys can sometimes be meant for our good. They can help teach us to Praise our wonderful God in times of trial. When I am able to do that, I immediately see wonderful blessings from my gracious Heavenly Father. I was recently sharing with our Pastor that, “I think God is still trying to teach me to praise Him through my trials.” This morning during my devotional, I came across this priceless bit of advice in my Women’s Study Bible, and I thought, “If this is helpful for me, perhaps it will be helpful to others.”

ADVERSITY – A Mountain to Climb

Adversity is not God’s ultimate desire for His creation; yet, there is a clear message that God uses adversity. He is in control over the most adverse of circumstances. We are wrong to presume that God is necessarily in the business of removing our adverse circumstances or reversing the situation that led to adversity. Rather, the Bible points to the conclusion that instead of taking us out of adversity, God is much more interested in taking us through it, using the adversity to effect something good in our lives.

Isaiah 43:2 “When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.” Oh, what comfort and peace I get from that verse.

Romans 5:3-5 “And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; And patience, experience; and experience, hope: And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.” I often cringe when I ask God for patience, because experience has taught me that for me to grow in that area means I must needs go through the challenges that bring it about. But, look at what comes after the bout with learning patience. It is worth the trials.

James 1:2-4 “My brethren, count it all joy when ye fall into divers temptations; Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.” As I read this verse today, I feel a little disappointed in myself for not grabbing and holding onto it during a recent time in a valley that nearly broke my heart in two. I so wish to immediately think on these truths and comforts from God’s Word. During those times when I have had the presence of mind to turn immediately to Him and His Word, I have received unspeakable comfort and peace in my Spirit. Memorizing verses from God’s Word are invaluable for help during these times.

Naomi and Ruth provide a great example of triumph over adversity. Women in Bible times had few independent or autonomous rights. As a result, most women depended upon the patronage of father, family, or husband. To lack such a protecting relationship was to invite adversity in many guises. Naomi’s family left Judah and went to Moab in search of food. There Naomi not only subsequently suffered the loss of her husband, but later the loss of her two sons as well. Utterly unprotected in a foreign land, she determined to return to her native city, Bethlehem, for safety.

Naomi’s story is significant because of the faithfulness of her daughter-in-law, Ruth, who could have chosen the protection of her homeland, Moab, but rather gave up her own rights. Ruth did not choose the suffering of widowhood, but she did choose the vulnerability and possible suffering involved in following Naomi back to Judah, turning her back on the security and protection of her family in Moab (Ruth 1). Here God clearly emerges as the Protector of the unprotected who place their faith in Him. The womanly wisdom of Naomi foreshadows Jesus’ character as revealed in the New Testament where He seeks those in need of being defended. Naomi was able to direct Ruth to Boaz, her kinsman redeemer, who, as Ruth’s husband became both for her and Naomi. In this story of faith were to be sown the seeds that would ultimately result in the birth, not only of Israel’s greatest king, David, but also of the Lord Jesus Christ Himself. This is one of the clearest examples of how God’s ultimate purpose is worked out through human adversity.

On a completely different plane, Esther first experienced adversity in being an orphan. Yet, God provided loving nurture for her through her cousin, Mordecai. Her utter trust in the sovereign God helped her to place all her human resources in God’s hands, and as a result, the Jews, God’s people, were ultimately preserved.

Adversity is something from which the human condition naturally recoils, but the higher message of the Bible exhorts believers to embrace every circumstance God sends or allows, even to go as far as to “count it all joy” in the hope that God’s ultimate purposes will be fulfilled. I have come to a place in my life where it has become easier for me to more quickly respond to adversity with the thought, “God is ultimately in control, and He is allowing this to happen, and if He is allowing this to happen, He will see me safely through it.”

God has graciously laid this passage on my heart for some time now, and I cling to it like a drowning man clinging to his life preserver: Romans 8:28-32 “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified. What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?”

About 3 years ago, I started sincerely asking God to help me to know Him more. During those times in the valleys, He reminds me of that request. I am getting better at realizing that He is doing just what I asked for, and thanking Him for what He is allowing.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on June 3, 2014 in God's Love, Godly Women

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: